Instrumentation

 
  • Campbell C-SAT
  • The Campbell CSAT is the sonic anemometer of choice for our meteorological stations at the HJ Andrews. As an omni-directional sonic, it provides optimal information about wind speed and temperature in complicated terrain.
  • Campbell IRGASON
  • I calibrated the Campbell IRGASON instruments deployed by the Oregon State UNiversity department of geography for research on SNOTEL sites across a transect in Oregon. These instruments will monitor changes in wind speed, direction, and CO2 fluxes as correlated to the effects of snowfall and snowpack, looking at the heat budget and albedo in conjunction with meteorological observations.
  • VAISALA GMP-343
  • I use the Vaisala GMP CO2 probes as validation for the CO2 readings taken by the Picarro inlets. These small probes are portable and raw feeds from them can be used with Campbell data loggers already deployed.
  • Li7500
  • I use the Li7500A gas analyzer on the met tower on watershed one to observe above and sub canopy fluxes of carbon dioxide. Data from the Li7500 is merged with data from sonic anemometers in order to compute sophisticated metrics for predicting canopy and subcanopy mixing and respiration.
  • Li8100A
  • I use the Li8100A long-term soil measurement (single chamber) instrument to observe soil CO2 efflux as well as CO2 concentration near the ground. Data from the Li8100A is cross-validated against a set of inlets to the Picarro iCO2 analyzer. Soil efflux is also predicted using an existing set of regression equations based on soil temperature and moisture from a corresponding site. Li8100A data is used to cross validate quadratic extrapolations of carbon dioxide profiles to the ground level.
  • Li610
  • I use the Li610 Dew Point generator to calibrate instruments such as the Li7500, Li8100, and Campbell IRGASON. By saturating its internal airstream at the current temperature and then cooling this air, an outflow of air at a known dewpoint can be generated and the temperature of this dewpoint validated against the temperature sensors on the instruments, allowing us calibrate the moisture sensors in sensitive instruments.
  • Li6400
  • Li680
  • Campbell CS615
  • I have 5 arrays of Campbell cs615s measuring soil moisture on a complex watershed. 4 of these arrays are on an elevational transect, with two probes measuring horizontally the moisture at 5 and 30 cm (he active zone for plant roots) and one integrating over the upper 30 cm soil. The fifth array is on a different soil type in a drier area of the watershed in order to get spatial variability.
  • CR dataloggers
  • Campbell dataloggers are prefered at HJ Andrews. I mostly use the CR10x logger, which relies on .DLD files for programming and must be connected to LoggerNet for access and downloads. Other models from which I extract data, such as the CR23X, can be connected to wirelessly, such that data is automatically downloaded.
  • Picarro iCO2 and iCH4
  • I used data from the Picarro iCO2 analyzer to construct canopy profiles of carbon dioxide fluxes. Our Picarro instrumentation also measures 13-C, and I will use the mixing ratio of 13-C to 12-C to test hypothesis about possible sources and sinks of CO2 fluxes in our complex terrain.
  • Lachat nitrate and ammonium autoanalyzer
  • I used the Lachat autoanalyzer to measure ammonium and nitrate in incubated and non-incubated soil samples, in order to calculate nitrogen mineralization over a one-month time period.
  • Leco, total organic carbon
  • I have used data collected by the LECO total organic carbon analyzer to look at spatial vairability in TOC stores in complex terrain. These data were processed by the central collaboratory at OSU.